Dance of the Northern Lights

Acrylic on Canvas
2021
I was in awe. I felt excited, happy, and a little afraid at the same time. This one winter, me and my cousins were out after supper playing a game of tag called Fox and Geese in the snow that had fallen earlier in the day. The sky had cleared, and, on the horizon, we could see Northern Lights beginning to show.

Not too long after, the lights were dancing right above us. There was this wonderful display of colours: yellow, green, pink…to orange and pale blue. It was the most beautiful and exciting thing I have ever seen. One of my cousins laid down in the snow to look up at the spectacular light show being put on by Nature just for us. Seemed like a good idea to join him and we were soon all on the ground making snow angels, laughing with joy and delight, and taking the beauty in. The lights had a way of brightening and fading, brightening and fading, speeding up and slowing down, speeding up and slowing down as they swirled across the sky.

Grandma had told us that the Northern Lights were the spirits of long ago up there dancing. In stories told around the campfire, we had heard that if you whistled at the lights, they would come closer to you. One of us started in and soon our little group of cheeky ragamuffins were all bravely whistling -- hoping and dreading that the lights would hear us.

And wouldn’t you know it! They seemed to come closer and closer and closer, circling right above our heads. We could feel the hair on our cold little necks rise. One by one, the whistling stopped on our lips and nobody…. said…. anything. We were all freaked out and to this day, I couldn’t say if it was just a coincidence or if the ancestors came to see us happy little kids playing in the dark in the snow.

Hear the song, "Dance of the Northern Lights," here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/art-music-series-48066155?utm_medium=clipboard_copy&utm_source=copy_to_clipboard&utm_campaign=postshare
Bookmark and Share

Future Events

The Cowichan Valley Regional District is a broad geographic region stretching from the Malahat to North Oyster and from the Cowichan Lake to Thetis Island.

The region's artists are represented by 5 sub-regional arts councils with support from the CVRD Arts and Culture Division